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Professor Jack Winkler

Emeritus Professor of Nutrition Policy
London Metropolitan University

Professor of Nutrition Policy at London Metropolitan University, until 2010.   Visiting lecturer at University College, London and MRC Human Nutrition Research, Cambridge.

Specialist researcher, policy analyst, writer, lecturer and consumer advocate on food, nutrition, and health.  Director of Nutrition Policy Unit, an independent consultancy to improve public health through dietary change, working primarily with public interest organisations. 

Founder, officer and/or member of most UK food advocacy groups, including Action on Sugars, Sustain, Consensus Action on Salt and Health, London Food Commission, National Food Alliance, Coronary Prevention Group, Joint Health Claims Initiative, Action and Information on Sugars.

Trained as sociologist at the London School of Economics and Stanford University.  Academic posts at the University of Kent, Imperial College London, Cranfield University, and King’s Fund Institute, working on a wide variety of economic and social policy issues.

Author of numerous articles, research reports, consultation documents, and briefing papers, on nutrition policy.  Selected recent publications include:

  • “Nutritional Reformulation: The Unobtrusive Strategy”, Food Science & Technology, March 2014
  • “Making the Healthy Choice the Cheaper Choice”, The Grocer, 20 December 2013
  • “Brutal Pragmatism on Food”, British Medical Journal, 29 June 2013
  • “Why Soft Drinks Taxes Will Not Work”, British Journal of Nutrition,  108, 395-396, 2012.*  The School Fringe: what secondary school pupils buy from the shops    around their schools, LMU Research Reports, 2008. *  “The Fundamental Flaw in Obesity Research” Obesity Reviews, 2005

 

Professor Jack Winkler will be speaking at:

Panel debate: Is it right to tax a category rather than an ingredient? And What will be next?

- 14:25 - 15:00

Panel Debate: What’s the impact of sugar on obesity and particularly childhood obesity?

- 10:10 - 10:40

How much do we need to cut sugar consumption? What policies are available for change?

- 09:45 - 10:00

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